You Should Never Buy Vytex Windows – Here’s Why

If you’re considering buying Vytex windows you’ll want to read this post. Here we’re outlining the reasons that anyone should avoid Vytex windows.

To be fair you’ll find that a window salesman will always tell you why you shouldn’t buy this brand or that brand so you’ll want to take this with a bit of a grain of salt. We’re playing devil’s advocate here a little bit, but these are the reasons a competing salesman will tell you to avoid Vytex windows.

Remember, if you think I’m wrong about something post a comment below.

First, they’re a small regional manufacturer

Buying windows with a lifetime warranty from a small local company is risky. That’s just a fact. I’ve been in this business for nearly 20 years now and I’ve seen many well respected window manufacturers close up shop with little to no notice.

It happens. When it does it leaves all of their customers out of luck. When a company vanishes there is no access to replacement parts. There is also no warranty at all at that point.

Will Vytex vanish like so many others? I have no idea, and neither do you and neither does the salesman trying to convince you to buy these windows. That’s the risk you run buying from a small manufacturer. It’s real and it shouldn’t be undervalued.

They use cheaper hardware than other higher-end brands

As an example of this, you will see most nicer window manufacturers using upgraded block and tackle balances in their windows. Vytex uses the constant force or coil balances that you commonly see in lower priced options.

That fact by itself may not be a huge deal, but it signals to me that they weren’t trying to compete with the nicest replacement windows. Even their top of the line Potomac HP windows use the constant force balances.

You will find the higher end hardware in premium brands like Sunrise, Okna, Gentek, Preservation and more.

The air infiltration rates are higher than the competition

When I started in this business nobody ever talked about air infiltration rates, but today it’s a big deal. Even their top of the line Potomac HP model doesn’t have ratings as good as the competition. Even lower cost brands will often be slightly better.

For all the talk about magnetic weather-stripping the air infiltration rate of these windows is higher than I’d like to see.

The glass area is smaller than other models

Based on the published VT ratings it appears the Vytex models will use darker glass and/or thicker frames than other window models. That means you’ll get less visible light in the same size window than you would with other options.

That might not matter a whole lot if you have large windows. If you have an older house or smaller windows this can be a big deal.

What’s the bottom line?

Considering the price that dealers usually charge for Vytex windows there may be better options out there. You can check this section to find recommended companies all over the country. It might be worthwhile to consider an option or two before you commit to Vytex windows.

If you’ve already committed you do have three business days to cancel an order in most states. With that in mind it might be worthwhile to get a second opinion quote so you understand the options.

Remember, we are playing devil’s advocate with a post like this. Vytex windows are fine and if you’ve bought them already I wouldn’t loose any sleep thinking about it. If you’re still shopping it might be worthwhile to consider your options.

How can you find a great window company?

That part is easy.  Check this section for recommendations of window companies all over the country. There’s no better way to get new windows. You can find my company here and you can find recommendations of other companies in other parts of the country here.

Other posts you might find interesting:

Why You Should NEVER Buy Simonton Windows!

If you’re considering buying Simonton windows you’ll want to read this post. Here we’re outlining the reasons that anyone should avoid Simonton windows.

To be fair you’ll find that a window salesman will always tell you why you shouldn’t buy this brand or that brand so you’ll want to take this with a bit of a grain of salt. We’re playing devil’s advocate here a little bit, but these are the reasons a competing salesman will tell you to avoid Simonton windows.

Remember, if you think I’m wrong about something post a comment below.

First, they’re lower end or “contractor grade” windows.

This is something you’ll always hear about Simonton windows. There is a little truth to it as Simonton is widely distributed and typically sold by smaller contractors who are more focused on price than quality.

The terms like “contractor grade” are always a little silly since they don’t really mean anything. The nugget of truth here is that they do use lower end components and older designs. That’s why you generally don’t see nicer window companies selling Simonton windows.

Next, Simonton windows use lower end components than other brands.

This one is mostly true. You’ll see Simonton windows use the lower end constant force or coil balances. Higher end products will generally use the upgraded block and tackle type balances that are tested to last longer and operate better.

best replacement window balances
Here you can see the main differences between constant force (used in Simonton windows) and the nicer block and tackle balances.

This is something that most customers don’t really know anything about. You can’t really see the balances when you’re looking at the windows. That means it’s an easy way for a manufacturer to cut a corner.

Simonton is owned by Ply Gem which also makes higher end brands like Great Lakes. They don’t want to interfere with the high end window sales so they keep Simonton windows a little cheaper. That makes sense from a business standpoint.

Simonton windows have higher air infiltration rates.

This is a common line used against Simonton windows and it’s worth considering. The air infiltration rates will be different with different Simonton models so there isn’t one answer. In general Simonton windows do have higher (worse) air infiltration rates than you’ll see from higher end manufacturers.

For example, most newer window designs will have air infiltration rates under 0.05. With some common Simonton models the air infiltration rate will be 2x or 3x that rate. Some new construction windows will be even worse.

That means more air can get through the windows when closed and locked. This is a common complaint about windows, so it’s something to consider.

Finally, the thicker frames will block more light.

This is another one that people sometimes don’t consider until it’s too late. Some popular Simonton windows like the 5500 series will use thicker frames than many other models. That means the same size window will provide less glass area than you’d get with a different window model.

Now, that’s not true with every model. For example the Impressions 9800 or the Reflections 5500 models do tend to have thicker frames but the Daylight Max or 5050 series will use slimmer frames.

The trick is that the slimmer models from Simonton tend to be their lower end designs so you give up other features when switching to those models.

So, you can get the nicer windows and features but you have to take the thicker frames. Or, you can get the slimmer windows with more glass are, but you get lower end windows. That’s not a great trade off if you ask me.

So, what’s the bottom line?

Keep in mind that a salesperson will typically tell you all about the downsides of any window model. The issues listed above are generally based in reality, but only you can decide how important they are.

It is true that most larger window companies don’t sell Simonton windows. They’re usually sold by smaller handyman or jack of all trade type of operations. That’s one indication that they’re not the best windows out there and they’re not a product my company would typically offer.

How can you find a great window company?

That’s easy. If you’re considering a window project you can check this section for recommendations for window companies all over the country. That’s the best way we know of to find a great local window company.

Other posts you might find interesting: